November 18, 2016

Famous Americans with Russian Roots


Famous Americans with Russian Roots
Russian Immigrants at Ellis Island

America is a land built by immigrants, people who come looking for opportunity, freedom, and a better life. And a fair number of those immigrants have come from Russia, the former Soviet Union, and the former Russian empire. According to the latest US Census data, there are about 3 million Russian-Americans in the US. 

We researched famous Americans with Russian roots and offer this compilation. Our database is by no means comprehensive, but it is the most complete list we have seen anywhere, and we will be constantly supplementing and adding to it (send us additions and updates).

{Click on the individual's profession or avocation to read short bio.}

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Some of Our Books

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At the Circus

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Moscow and Muscovites

Moscow and Muscovites

Vladimir Gilyarovsky's classic portrait of the Russian capital is one of Russians’ most beloved books. Yet it has never before been translated into English. Until now! It is a spectactular verbal pastiche: conversation, from gutter gibberish to the drawing room; oratory, from illiterates to aristocrats; prose, from boilerplate to Tolstoy; poetry, from earthy humor to Pushkin. 
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A Taste of Chekhov

This compact volume is an introduction to the works of Chekhov the master storyteller, via nine stories spanning the last twenty years of his life.
Murder at the Dacha

Murder at the Dacha

Senior Lieutenant Pavel Matyushkin has a problem. Several, actually. Not the least of them is the fact that a powerful Soviet boss has been murdered, and Matyushkin's surly commander has given him an unreasonably short time frame to close the case.
The Little Golden Calf

The Little Golden Calf

Our edition of The Little Golden Calf, one of the greatest Russian satires ever, is the first new translation of this classic novel in nearly fifty years. It is also the first unabridged, uncensored English translation ever, and is 100% true to the original 1931 serial publication in the Russian journal 30 Dnei. Anne O. Fisher’s translation is copiously annotated, and includes an introduction by Alexandra Ilf, the daughter of one of the book’s two co-authors.
Jews in Service to the Tsar

Jews in Service to the Tsar

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Maria's War: A Soldier's Autobiography

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Woe From Wit (bilingual)

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Bears in the Caviar

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