October 07, 2022

Beginning of the End?


Beginning of the End?
President Vladimir Putin in Serbia, 2019.
 Happy Birthday, Mr. President.
 
Not!
 
Today is the 70th birthday of Russia's authoritarian-in-chief, President Vladimir Putin. Appropriately so, it was announced that the Nobel Peace Prize had been awarded to the Memorial Human Rights organization (liquidated by the Russian Supreme Court in a political hit job), Belarussian rights activist Ales Belyatsky, and Ukraine's Center for Civil Rights.
 
Also today, Meduza published an account (machine-translated by Google at the link below), based on revealing information from Kremlin insiders. Putin's world of shadows and mirrors, terror and misinformation, is unraveling.
 
Read the article in Russian / in English.
 
The article paints a picture of Putin making countless decisions without consulting advisors or ministers, of massive fear and uncertainty in the ranks of the elite, of endless promises and money running out.
 
Meanwhile, Putin's war-crime aggression against Ukraine is also falling apart. Troops are dispirited and under-prepared, turning on their heels and fleeing in the face of Ukrainian attacks. The mass mobilization has led hundreds of thousands of Russians to flee the country.  And a circular firing squad is ensuing as the president and his allies are being attacked by the "party of war."
 
In short, time is running out for the Putin regime. The fear, of course, is that a cornered Putin will lash out, that an even more dictatorial faction will move to seize power, in order to prosecute the war even more ruthlessly, or, worst of all, that things will spiral into nuclear confrontation.
 
Things are clearly at a turning point and one can only hope that sane members of the elite will step in and put a stop to the madness, that Russians will be moved to act like they did in 1991 and make a stand for their freedom and their future.
 
That, in any event, is our birthday wish.
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