October 11, 2021

A Glorious Gazebo


A Glorious Gazebo
Ah yes, classical Russian architecture. Vyacheslav Sabrekov, VKontakte

Recently, the village of Kabakovo, in the autonomous Russian republic of Bashkortostan, christened a new municipal construction with appropriate pomp and circumstance. But that's only half the story.

Photos circulating online have drawn attention to what appears to be a pretty shoddy job, with exposed particle-board walls, bare floorboards, and a covering of corrugated metal.

While some have defended and encouraged the residents of Kabakovo, congratulating them on their new amenity, one internet denizen spoke for others when he commented, "This is a shame and a spit in the face of the people."

The building, a community "gazebo" with games, seating areas, and tea, was built to the tune of 161,120 rubles ($2225) of local tax money. While the shelter might make gathering more comfortable, it's tough to tell from photos whether it's heated or even sealed from the wind and rain (and snow).

Haven't we seen this one before?

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