September 21, 2020

What Are You, Blind?


What Are You, Blind?
When you can't see well, all the cars look like they're the fuzz. The RussianLife files

The Prosecutor's Office for Orenburg Region announced earlier this week that it is launching an investigation into a blind man who has had a drivers' license for the last two years.

The resident of the town of Mednogorsk was declared blind in both eyes in 2018, following an eye disease that began in 2004. Also in 2018, the individual applied for and apparently received a license to operate motor vehicles. How this happened is anyone's guess.

"This ailment [blindness] prevents a citizen from using and driving a car independently, since, having a medical preclusion to driving, he can expose himself and other road users to real danger," the prosecutor said, providing valuable insight into why those who can't see probably shouldn't attempt to drive.

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