August 01, 2022

The Transfer of Regions


The Transfer of Regions
A referendum to complete the conquest. The old State Duma building in Moscow. Wikimedia Commons, Gennady Grachev

This fall, the state Duma may consider the legality of declaring Ukrainian territories to be part of Russia.

Already, areas under occupation have begun the process of integration. Russia began capturing Ukrainian territories in February, and in May the military began creating "ruble zones." These zones enforce the use of Russian currency, and the military has given a four-month grace period for use of the Ukrainian hryvnia, after which the hryvnia will cease to be a valid form of payment. 

Russian officials have also organized the broadcast of Russian TV channels and radio stations, as well as creating an exclusively Russian internet. All this alongside broad efforts to bring Ukrainian citizens into Moscow's fold.

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