October 12, 2021

The Little Bike That Could


The Little Bike That Could
It's not all about the big wheels, after all.  Photo via YouTube

While recent trends always seem to be reaching for the bigger and better, Krasnodar resident and bicycle enthusiast Sergei Dashevsky chose to downsize for his most recent project which has now officially earned him a title in the Guinness Book of World Records.  

Dashevsky's invention is a bicycle that measures 8.4 centimeters long and eight centimeters tall. While the bike looks like a toy, it actually is a fully functional bicycle, although it takes some specialized knowledge and skill to actually be able to use the device. 

Dashevsky actually invented the mini-bike back in 2019 (and earned the Russian national record for it) but has not been able to officially file for the world record until now due to the pandemic. But Dashevsky's love for bicycling goes back even farther than that; for years, he has been building bikes of his own design and using them to compete in marathons in foreign countries. 

The bicycle joins other Russian Guinness World Record holders such as the greatest number of simultaneous weddings to take place on public transport, the world's largest cheesecake, and the largest Greek salad

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