September 10, 2021

Robots Hit the Road



Robots Hit the Road
"Beep boop, your fare is $17.25 for driving two blocks, beep." The Russian Life files

This week in "has technology gone to far": Russia's Ministry of Economic Development has announced that, in partnership with technology giant Yandex, they will be releasing driverless taxis in three Russian cities within the next year or two.

The three cities–Innopolis in Tatarstan, Moscow, and Sochi–will begin introducing driverless cars this fall, with operational systems (hopefully) online next year. The drone vehicles will be easily recognizable, with "A" markings signifying their autonomous nature.

In the initial stages, supervisory operators will ride along, but in later iterations, passengers will simply have the ability to contact Yandex for technical help, which makes us think of a Kafkaesque scenario in which a hapless passenger imprisoned by a malevolent autonomous taxi is stuck on hold.

Regardless, happy trails, robo-taxis. We hope to see a whole new crop of dashcam videos.

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