August 21, 2021

Recovering from Covid? Bring on the Russian Ballad



Recovering from Covid? Bring on the Russian Ballad
A Russian national dance Kenny Grady, Flickr

Head of the clinical research department of the Central Research Institute of Epidemiology of Russia’s Rospotrebnadzor Khadizhat Omarova has recommended a personalized approach to recover from the coronavirus. While some advice is useful for everyday living – exercising, getting enough sleep and eating well – Omarova also suggested a more specific routine to reinvigorate the lungs.

Russian folk songs of the lengthy type might be the perfect breathing exercise. As you exhale, Omarova explained, sing softly and at a comfortable range. This will help exercise parts of your body that the disease can hurt, like the diaphragm, throat, and lungs.

Perhaps Kalinka, perhaps Katyusha. What better change of tune than to practice your folk song, too?

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