November 09, 2021

Missing Lynx in Transportation


Missing Lynx in Transportation
Imagine trying to explain to your boss that you missed your ride because a lynx was at the bus stop.  Photo by Oleh Morhun via Unsplash 

Driving down the street in Russia, you might expect to spy a few babushky waiting at the bus stop to catch a ride, but never a Siberian Lynx, like this driver caught on video while passing a bus stop in Blagoveshchensk

In the video you can see the fluffy feline curled up patiently on the bus stop bench, presumably waiting for its ride, until the videographer gets closer and the lynx goes hopping away. Perhaps it realized that it had forgotten its bus pass at home? Or maybe it just finally decided to call an Uber instead?

Russian wildlife experts weighed in on the video, saying that it is quite normal for young cats like this to mingle with civilization like this, because they are still not fully aware of the danger of human beings, and are more interested in exploring different places. Thankfully, curiosity didn’t kill the cat this time. 

It seems like everyone in Russia takes public transport, big cats and small cats alike. Well, with such outstanding subway systems, who wouldn’t? However, our favorite way to travel is still via the classic tram

 

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