May 31, 2021

iTeacher



iTeacher
Who better to teach robotics than a robot themselves?  Photo by Alex Knight via Unsplash

Those worried about robots taking  their jobs may have cause for concern, because the first Russian robotic teacher recently began working in a kindergarten in the northern city of Novy Urengoy

Russian company Promobot designed the machine to be able to interact with children and help them to learn more about the basics of robotics in the classroom. Like any good pedagogue, the robot not only knows how to talk to its pupils, but it can also play games with them. 

The company sees robotics and technology playing an even larger role in the world that these children will help to build, and wants to use their resources to educate and prepare for the next generation of innovators. The ability to easily communicate with a robot might be a vital skill for them in the not-so-distant future. And it's probably easier than virtual classes.

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The Little Humpbacked Horse

A beloved Russian classic about a resourceful Russian peasant, Vanya, and his miracle-working horse, who together undergo various trials, exploits and adventures at the whim of a laughable tsar, told in rich, narrative poetry.
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93 Untranslatable Russian Words

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The Frogs Who Begged for a Tsar

The Frogs Who Begged for a Tsar

The fables of Ivan Krylov are rich fonts of Russian cultural wisdom and experience – reading and understanding them is vital to grasping the Russian worldview. This new edition of 62 of Krylov’s tales presents them side-by-side in English and Russian. The wonderfully lyrical translations by Lydia Razran Stone are accompanied by original, whimsical color illustrations by Katya Korobkina.
Russia Rules

Russia Rules

From the shores of the White Sea to Moscow and the Northern Caucasus, Russian Rules is a high-speed thriller based on actual events, terrifying possibilities, and some really stupid decisions.
The Spine of Russia

The Spine of Russia

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Survival Russian

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Fish: A History of One Migration

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