June 02, 2021

Internet Writing 101


Internet Writing 101
We Russian Life authors can actually say that, if blogging had been a subject in school, we'd get use out of what we learned. The Russian Life files.

Apparently Russia is backtracking on its previous assertion that blogging isn't a promising career path.

Last week, Russia's Ministry of Education announced that it was considering adding blogging to the curricula of pedagogical universities. The revelation came at a meeting for a society of educators in Nizhny Novgorod, where Sergei Kravstov, minister of education, let it slip.

The program would reportedly focus on online etiquette as well as strategies for effective online writing (and, we assume, how to write nasty Facebook comments and debunk what their grandparents post). After all, noted the minister, more than 90 percent of schoolchildren are on the internet, a number solidified by pandemic restrictions.

In the twenty-first century, knowing how to communicate online is a useful ability. And, as we can attest, blogging is a life-long skill.

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The fables of Ivan Krylov are rich fonts of Russian cultural wisdom and experience – reading and understanding them is vital to grasping the Russian worldview. This new edition of 62 of Krylov’s tales presents them side-by-side in English and Russian. The wonderfully lyrical translations by Lydia Razran Stone are accompanied by original, whimsical color illustrations by Katya Korobkina.
Moscow and Muscovites

Moscow and Muscovites

Vladimir Gilyarovsky's classic portrait of the Russian capital is one of Russians’ most beloved books. Yet it has never before been translated into English. Until now! It is a spectactular verbal pastiche: conversation, from gutter gibberish to the drawing room; oratory, from illiterates to aristocrats; prose, from boilerplate to Tolstoy; poetry, from earthy humor to Pushkin. 
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