October 30, 2020

Don't Drive Tanked


Don't Drive Tanked
Vroom, vroom. Vitaly V. Kuzmin, Wikimedia Commons

A pair of Russian soldiers were detained in Volgograd following an incident that, as is wont to happen these days, has made them internet celebrities overnight.

A 29-year-old corporal, operating a BMP-3 infantry fighting vehicle, lost control at 55 mph and plowed into a perimeter wall at Volgograd's international airport. Operations at the airport reportedly continued unaffected, and the vehicle itself, which weighs over twenty heavily-armored tons, sustained little damage.

Those at the scene, as well as a growing internet audience, were quick to pin the accident on prodigious consumption of alcohol. Video of the incident is, if nothing else, impressive, as the vehicle plows through a concrete barrier with ease.

Russia's defense ministry has not confirmed local (and internet) rumors that the driver was intoxicated, but that's never stopped the internet before, has it?

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