August 10, 2021

Cops and Robots



Cops and Robots
Promobot Image from the Promobot website

On July 30, Russian news outlet Izvestiya reported that Germany’s first security robot, intended to decrease pressures on police and guards, was manufactured in Russia. The first edition of its kind is stationed at Berlin’s security company “Security-Robotics.”

The robot, known as “Promobot,” is more efficient than the teacher with eyes in the back of her head. It not only surveils visitors to some premises, but also employees during its patrolling – and provides helpful advice in English and German to boot.

Promobot is designed to be a panacea for human error. It does not get tired, never arrives late, is not rude and “does not make mistakes” – when it comes to measuring a person’s temperature or remembering the answers to specific questions, at least.

The android’s eponymous company "Promobot" intends to offer its wares to at least 30 other German firms. The product has already been placed in the United Arab Emirates and Kazakhstan’s Department of Internal Affairs.

While Russian robots might not be the queens of the scene yet in other countries, this does not preclude their active participation in the Federation's affairs. Russia has previously debuted android journalists and space cadets. What might they think of next?

 

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