September 18, 2020

Bring Out the Big Guns



Bring Out the Big Guns
If a sniper misses, does he say "Shoot"? Dmitry Rogulin, TASS

Russian firm Lobayev Arms is best known for their accurate weapons. Their newest creation, however, would top them all.

The DXL-5 "Havoc," set to be unveiled this November and put on the market shortly after, is said to boast an effective range of seven kilometers, or 4.35 miles. A bullet leaving the weapon will travel at four to five times the speed of sound.

According to the company, the high range will allow even relatively untrained shooters to hit targets far away, reducing the amount of preparation necessary for sharpshooters.

Almost surprisingly, the project is not funded by Russia's Defense Ministry, and is instead the brainchild of Lobayev.

We anticipate a new glut of 360 no-scope compilations on YouTube for 2021.

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