March 11, 2022

Blue and Yellow Lights


Blue and Yellow Lights
The Empire State Building, customized.  Screenshot, Twitter @EmpireStateBldg

A nation's flag is arguably the most symbolic and meaningful figure representing one's patriotism. Shortly following Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine, multiple cities and nations have shown their solidarity with Ukraine by raising the country's flag in their own way.

Landmarks across the globe are being lit with bright blue and yellow lights. While some may think it a small gesture that has no true effect, for many it symbolizes Ukrainian independence and patriotism in these unpredictable times

New York City, which holds the US' largest population of Ukrainians, has thus lit up the Empire State Building, the World Trade Center, the Mid-Hudson Bridge, and the Kosciuszko Bridge with shining blue and yellow lights.

The national flag of Ukraine is a simple yet meaningful design. The flag is a bicolor with blue on top and yellow on bottom, symbolizing blue skies over golden fields of grain. The design was adopted on January 28, 1992, shortly following Ukraine's independence.

Other examples of national and international landmarks that have shined blue and yellow: 

- The Eiffel Tower in Paris, France.

- The London Eye in Lambeth, London.

- The Colosseum in Rome, Italy.

- The Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Germany.

- Sundial Bridge in Redding, California.

- Dublin's Pedestrian Bridge, Veteran's Glass City Skyway Bridge, Cleveland Skyline, Licking County Courthouse, and the George V. Voinovich Bridge, all in Ohio.

- John Ringling Causeway in Sarasota, Florida.

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