October 19, 2021

A Bare Cat-art-strophe in Kazan


A Bare Cat-art-strophe in Kazan
Ban the booty? kazan_only on Instagram

A resident of Kazan got into a social media huff on October 13 when she noticed artist Kristina Mitnichuk painting another female figure in Freedom Square in the city's center. The subject was, for the indignant woman at least, far too scantily clad, though the model was not laying it all bare. She posed clothed in red lingerie and black high-heeled boots.

“I am writing this comment because I was outraged by the trick of the artist (though what kind of art is it??), who paints a naked girl right in the very center of the city. My husband is looking at this, at a half-naked woman, and in general this is some kind of disrespect!” the user complained on one of the city’s public Instagram pages. She also wrote that she alerted the police, who did not react.

Most of those who commented on the post defended the artist, and a number laughed about the woman’s defense of her maligned husband: “What a husband. I also would have looked,” wrote user 116alinakzn. Others seemed to enjoy the sight themselves, such as vit_0001, who commented, “I want more of these kinds of artists and models on the streets of the city. I’m sure Kazan will become even more beautiful.”

Of course, other reactions were not so positive. A few suggested the artist might have chosen a better place, such as the beach, to stage her muse; others were concerned about the ethical implications. User shakurova1989 lamented that children would have noticed the scene, too; and gulnaz_diplomi called the act “immoral,” complaining that it seems people now are beginning to “confuse dignity with vulgarity.”

Though some believe true art will never be a crowd-pleaser, Mitnichuk and her model seemed to get along just fine with a few likes and the bare necessities. It’s not like this is the first time a Russian art project has ended with someone getting nearly naked, anyway.

 

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