January 22, 2022

Tykes Take to the Web


Tykes Take to the Web
Think twice before typing what you're about to type. The RussianLife files.

Don't forget to set your Safe Search: kids are invading cyberspace.

A new study published by Moscow's Higher School of Economics (HSE) reveals that Russian kids ages 3-6 are entering the internet in droves. According to their research, three times as many children of these ages are now online compared to ten years ago: in 2011, only some 22.6% of this age range was online; today, that number is 68.3%.

Not surprisingly, the vast majority of Russian teenagers are online: some 95%, up only 3% from 2011. 7-11-year-olds nearly doubled, from 42.2% to 83.3%, and 11-14-year-olds, 72% to 94.4%. 90% of Russian adults are online, too.

Surely coronavirus has boosted these numbers, as well as general trends in global culture and technology. Per the study, 83.7% of kids use the internet for school, a statistic we're a little skeptical of.

Our hope, regardless of age, is that they join our RussianLife.com readership.

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Fearful Majesty

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This acclaimed biography of one of Russia’s most important and tyrannical rulers is not only a rich, readable biography, it is also surprisingly timely, revealing how many of the issues Russia faces today have their roots in Ivan’s reign.
A Taste of Chekhov

A Taste of Chekhov

This compact volume is an introduction to the works of Chekhov the master storyteller, via nine stories spanning the last twenty years of his life.
Life Stories: Original Fiction By Russian Authors

Life Stories: Original Fiction By Russian Authors

The Life Stories collection is a nice introduction to contemporary Russian fiction: many of the 19 authors featured here have won major Russian literary prizes and/or become bestsellers. These are life-affirming stories of love, family, hope, rebirth, mystery and imagination, masterfully translated by some of the best Russian-English translators working today. The selections reassert the power of Russian literature to affect readers of all cultures in profound and lasting ways. Best of all, 100% of the profits from the sale of this book are going to benefit Russian hospice—not-for-profit care for fellow human beings who are nearing the end of their own life stories.
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Murder at the Dacha

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The Little Golden Calf

The Little Golden Calf

Our edition of The Little Golden Calf, one of the greatest Russian satires ever, is the first new translation of this classic novel in nearly fifty years. It is also the first unabridged, uncensored English translation ever, and is 100% true to the original 1931 serial publication in the Russian journal 30 Dnei. Anne O. Fisher’s translation is copiously annotated, and includes an introduction by Alexandra Ilf, the daughter of one of the book’s two co-authors.
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Faith & Humor: Notes from Muscovy

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Stargorod: A Novel in Many Voices

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White Magic

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Fish: A History of One Migration

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