August 14, 2020

Tsoy's Last Concert


Tsoy's Last Concert
Tsoi remains popular in Russia today. Image by Tim Penn via Wikimedia Commons

When considering the history of contemporary Russian music, one rock icon repeatedly pops out: Viktor Tsoy. Tsoy’s legacy, along with the group he cofounded, Kino, has long been a favorite of Russian music lovers. Now, fans of the group can enjoy a recording of their last concert before Tsoi’s tragic death in an automobile accident in 1990.

On August 15, the thirtieth anniversary of Tsoi’s death, Pervy Kanal will broadcast a recording of Kino’s last concert at the Luzhniki Stadium. This recording was previously believed to be lost, but has recently been rediscovered. The concert, not originally well-known among the broader public, took place on June 24, 1990, less than two months before Tsoi’s untimely death.

Yuri Aksyuta, the chief music and entertainment producer for Pervyi Kanal, reported that they are working on restoring the video in time for its broadcast: “Unfortunately, it [the recording] is not of the best quality, so now we are engaged in the restoration of the concert and by August 15 we will try to have time to restore it, as much as possible in such a short time.”

Tags: rock music

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