August 04, 2022

Time to Move?


Time to Move?
Is it, though? A screenshot from the video. Russian Embassy in Spain

The Kremlin recently released an English-language propaganda video explaining why one should move to Russia.

The 52-second video was posted on July 28 by the "Rusia en España" Twitter account, an official mouthpiece of the Russian embassy in Spain. In it, a masculine voice (robotic, unaccented, with a slightly Russian tint) lists out several points of Russian national pride, including "Christianity," "beautiful women," and "ballet," in a style that feels like it could almost be satire.

Indeed, the video has been met with confusion and humor; a handful of edits of the video have already appeared, and some in the West see the video as a provocation, as it intentionally targets Western decadence and "cancel culture."

Its many claims are dubious, to say the least. Anyone who has been to Russia can attest that its "delicious cuisine" is indeed tasty at best but dire at worst. "Cheap taxi and delivery" is an odd point, and Russian dash cam videos provide evidence that maybe you get what you pay for. "Beautiful architecture" applies in some city centers, but not in apartment-block suburbs. One also has to wonder what kinds of "traditional values" are being promoted under a regime that's been arresting dissenters left and right for the last six months.

And as for the boasting of "[an] economy that can withstand thousands of sanctions" ... well, we'll just have to wait and see...

For "world famous literature" the video shows images of Pushkin and Gogol, writers who are largely unknown in the West, but revered in Russia, lending credence that this is a product of the Kremlin.

The video ends with a dubious "Don't Delay... Winter Is Coming," perhaps a reference to the hit American TV show "Game of Thrones," or to the fact that European winter heating has become dependent upon Russian gas.

The more you watch it, the weirder it gets. Surely it's one of the most bizarre responses to the invasion of Ukraine. And it originated from the Russian side, no less.

 

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