February 15, 2023

Russia Cuts Ties with a Rock Star


Russia Cuts Ties with a Rock Star
Zemfira. Wikimedia Commons, Denhud.

The Ministry of Justice has declared Zemfira, a famous Russian rock singer, a foreign agent due to her outspoken remarks about Russia's War on Ukraine. [Russian Life profiled her in 2001.]

Since the start of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Zemfira Ramazanova has adamantly come out in opposition to the war, releasing an anti-war music video that included footage of Russia’s military assault on Ukraine as well as anti-war protests in Moscow.

According to the Ministry of Justice, Zemfira has “openly spoken in support of Ukraine, carrying out concerts in unfriendly countries with calls against the special military operation and received support from foreign sources.”

Since this declaration, concerns surrounding public support for the singer have risen. Alexander Sharifulin, a deputy of the Sakhalin Regional Duma, is demanding authorities paint over a graffiti portrait of Zemfira on the side of a transformer substation. Sharifulin wrote on his Telegram channel that “these people have been corrupting the minds of the younger generation for years by broadcasting perverted Western ideas about life, earning colossal fortunes, and not bearing any responsibility.” 

AFter Sharifulin’s remarks, according to one poll, 36% of the region's residents approved the graffiti, while 41% said it should be removed.

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