August 29, 2022

Puppy Love


Puppy Love
Stray dog in a Moscow animal shelter. VDNKh

On August 19, the mayor of Moscow invited citizens to attend a festival for stray animals at VDNKh. The event took place on the eve of International Homeless Animals Day to encourage Muscovites to adopt cats and dogs in need of new homes.

Thirteen city shelters in Moscow care for more than 16,000 animals. Since January, about 1500 pets have been brought home by new owners, and the city of Moscow is organizing campaigns to increase adoption.

Five cats and five dogs from the shelters "Zoorasvet" and "Zelenograd" participated in an exhibition at the festival, and six of the animals were adopted. Attendees viewed the profiles of other pets in printed catalogs. They can now visit them in the shelters. 

In addition to socializing with the animals, guests of the festival listened to three lectures intended to educate pet owners about training and caring for their four-legged friends.

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