June 15, 2020

Peace Out!


Peace Out!
One of Russia's more peace-inducing monuments. The RussianLife files.

For the second year in a row, Russia's performance on the Global Peace Index is a little lower than one might expect. The country found itself in the same place as last year: 154 out of the total 163 countries measured.

Russia's level of militarization, the presence of nuclear weapons, and high levels of weapons exports all contributed to the score, as well as domestic and foreign political situations. Russia's spot is neighbored by Sudan (153rd place) and the Central African Republic (155th).

But Russia is in good company: most large, world-power countries scored low on the list, with the U.S. in the 121st slot and China at 124. Geographically smaller, less populous countries Iceland, New Zealand, and Portugal took places 1, 2, and 3, respectively.

See the global stats for yourself here; there's even a state-by-state one for the U.S.

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