February 24, 2020

Oh, Deer.


Oh, Deer.
RussianLife.com: News you caribout! Are G Nilsen, Wikimedia Commons

The "oldest livestock industry" of Russia's Far Eastern Sakhalin Island could see a renaissance of activity under new legislation that seeks t protect reindeer herders.

According to SakhalinMedia.ru, in the past, reindeer herders on the island raised as many as three thousand head of deer. Today, that number is closer to 150.

The bill is being touted as a way of addressing the needs of residents, as well as the "socio-economic and demographic problems" of indigenous peoples of the region. Local deputies characterize the bill as support for local agricultural industry.

Keep in mind that these are herders of reindeer, not caribou. The difference, of course, is that caribou can't fly.

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