January 06, 2020

Mystical Mystery in Chelyabinsk Museum


Mystical Mystery in Chelyabinsk Museum
The 2013 Chelyabinsk meteor. Alex Alishevskikh (CC)

The protective dome over a fragment of the meteor that struck Chelyabinsk in 2013 mysteriously rose all on its own in December, according to a Facebook post by the in the Southern Urals History Museum’s press secretary, Aivar Valeyev.

Usually, there is an entire process to raise the dome, and yet it seemingly raised itself on December 14, and was even caught on camera. The occurrence was so surprising that museum workers drafted an Act to officially record the event.

Press Secretary Valeyev later stated that the dome’s rising was due to a technical malfunction, and that no humans were involved in its movement. Nevertheless, workers say they have experienced mystical occurrences in the days after the dome’s raising. Could this be a foreshadowing event for the meteor expected to fall near Chelyabinsk in 2043?

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