December 29, 2023

Gulag Archipelago Turns 50


Gulag Archipelago Turns 50

Fifty years ago today, in 1973, The Gulag Archipelago was published. It was an exhaustive, horrific chronicle of the horrors of the Stalinist terror machine. And a book that still evokes controversy, perhaps because of the echoes with modern trends to totalitarianism in Russia.

It's a good time to go back and read this exclusive interview {digital subscription required} we did with Alexander Solzhenitsyn's wife, Natalaya, in 2008, just 3 months before his death.

We also did a rather extensive biography of Solzhenitsyn in 1997, on the occasion of his return to Russia and his cross-country tour. {digital subscription required)

 

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Steppe / Степь

Steppe / Степь

This is the work that made Chekhov, launching his career as a writer and playwright of national and international renown. Retranslated and updated, this new bilingual edition is a super way to improve your Russian.
A Taste of Russia

A Taste of Russia

The definitive modern cookbook on Russian cuisine has been totally updated and redesigned in a 30th Anniversary Edition. Layering superbly researched recipes with informative essays on the dishes' rich historical and cultural context, A Taste of Russia includes over 200 recipes on everything from borshch to blini, from Salmon Coulibiac to Beef Stew with Rum, from Marinated Mushrooms to Walnut-honey Filled Pies. A Taste of Russia shows off the best that Russian cooking has to offer. Full of great quotes from Russian literature about Russian food and designed in a convenient wide format that stays open during use.
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Life Stories: Original Fiction By Russian Authors

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Fish: A History of One Migration

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Woe From Wit (bilingual)

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