May 27, 2024

Change for a Cuppa?


Change for a Cuppa?
Delicious, but expensive. The Russian Life files

Russia's tea and coffee consumption has historically been neck-and-neck. Now, with rising coffee prices, tea could take the top.

Russian state media pointed to repercussions from the pandemic, plus a poor harvest in Vietnam, as reasons for a shortage of the Robusta coffee variety. Overall coffee imports are down 11.8%.

These shortages have led to a nearly 20% increase in prices in April 2024 alone. As a result, coffee is at its highest price in Russia since 1979. From 2020 to 2023, the price of a single cup increased by 118%.

Adding to these woes are international conflicts, such as those in the Middle East and, likely, Russia's war in Ukraine.

For now, though, it may be best to stick to tea.

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