March 30, 2020

Yandex's New Index


Yandex's New Index
The new index analyzes how many people are on the streets. Image via Pxfuel

The Russian company Yandex has developed an index of self-isolation to analyze to what degree Russians are staying home during the coronavirus pandemic. To calculate the index, Yandex examined anonymized data from Yandex applications, then compared the level of urban activity now versus on a normal day before the epidemic.

The index goes from 0-5 points. When the index falls between 0-2.4 points, then there are many people on the streets and the level of self-isolation is low. This is considered the red zone, due to the high likelihood of spreading coronavirus. Between 2.5-3.9 points indicates that most people are home (yellow zone), and a score from 4-5 points means there is almost no one on the streets, which is the green zone and suggests a low likelihood of spreading coronavirus.

The index is currently fluctuating  between 2.4-4 for the entire country. According to Yandex’s data, last week all of Russia, and Moscow in particular, was in the red zone, with a switch to the yellow zone over the weekend. Now that President Putin declared this week a non-work week, we’ll see how many Russian cities make it into the green zone.

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