May 18, 2020

"Victory Day" Sung from Balconies



"Victory Day" Sung from Balconies
Victory Day is traditionally celebrated with a parade. Image by Svetlana Novikova via Pixabay

This year was the 75th anniversary of Victory Day, celebrated on May 9 in Russia. This major holiday is very important to Russians, and usually is marked by a huge parade in Moscow. This year, however, the holiday looked a little different, due to the novel coronavirus pandemic.

Instead of the traditional parade, people took to their balconies or stood in front of windows with pictures of relatives who had participated in World War II. After a moment of silence at 7:00 PM, people all over Russia joined together in song, singing the song “Den Pobedy” (“Victory Day”). While people were singing, TV channels showed various people joining in.

President Putin has promised that a parade will occur once the situation with the coronavirus pandemic is more under control. For this year’s 75th celebration, 75 planes and helicopters flew over Moscow. Many other cities in Russia, such as Yekaterinburg, Samara, and Volgograd, also used aviation shows to mark the holiday, with over 600 planes and helicopters participating in air shows all over Russia. In St. Petersburg, there was also a naval demonstration.

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