April 18, 2020

Tracking Coronavirus Patients... With Ankle Bracelets



Tracking Coronavirus Patients... With Ankle Bracelets
One region is literally tracking people with coronavirus. Image by Jérémy-Günther-Heinz Jähnick via Wikimedia Commons

As the coronavirus pandemic has intensified, many organizations, including Yandex, have begun tracking various aspects of the outbreak. One region is now taking a further step in tracking by buying ankle tracking bracelets to monitor patients who tested positive for COVID-19.

The governor of Murmansk Oblast recently announced plans to buy up to 2,000 ankle tracking bracelets for certain patients who have tested positive for the coronavirus. Only patients who do not have severe cases of coronavirus will be eligible for being treated at home – and getting an ankle bracelet.

The region plans to spend R1.5 million (approximately $20,000) on 120 ankle tracking bracelets with Bluetooth capabilities, 300 extra straps, and 30 extra Bluetooth sensors. The funding for the tracking bracelets will come from the city’s reserve fund.

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