March 13, 2020

The Dangers of Vegetarianism



The Dangers of Vegetarianism
Can vegetarians survive and be healthy in Russia? Image by Rene Cortin via Wikimedia Commons

According to Vladimir Bolibok, a Russian immunologist, vegetarianism in Russia can be dangerous. He said that Russian vegetarians risk vitamin deficiencies and other diseases.

Bolibok added that the culture of vegetarianism is not well developed in Russia. Russia does not have an agro-industrial industry, and, as a result, it is hard for vegetarians to obtain a well-rounded diet. This puts them at risk not only for vitamin deficiencies but also for anemia.

Bolibok said vegetarians should consult a nutritionist, who can help them find the most beneficial food items. Moreover, Bolibok added that diets need to be varied: “If you periodically change your diet and try something new, then the variety of products that are on the shelves leads to the fact that you will not have a sharp deficiency of vitamins or minerals in the body.”

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