April 16, 2020

TBT: The Treaty of Rapallo



TBT: The Treaty of Rapallo
The Germans and Russians negotiate at Rapallo. From left: Unknown man, German Chancellor Joseph Wirth, Soviet Commissar of Foreign Trade Leonid Krasin, Commissar of Foreign Affairs Georgy Chicherin, Soviet diplomat Adolf Joffe.

On this day in 1922, two international pariahs – Germany and Bolshevik Russia – signed a pact in Rapallo that gave each side something they wanted. What could possibly go wrong? Well, unfortunately, the agreement sped the path to German rearmament and the horrors of the Second World War that would follow.

Read a more detailed account here, from our March 2012 issue. (Normally subscription access only.)

The Outcasts Join Forces
  • March 01, 2012

The Outcasts Join Forces

Pariahs Germany and Soviet Russia make a pact in 1922 that sets the stage for decades of suffering.
The White Émigré Epic
  • November 01, 2018

The White Émigré Epic

Thousands of war refugees are flooding Europe from the East. No, this is not a story of today, but of the world a century ago.
Berlinograd
  • January 01, 2010

Berlinograd

No other part of Europe can match Berlin and its immediate hinterland for having such a prolonged engagement with Russia. In fact, locals sometimes refer to the German capital as Berlinograd.
Soviet Foreign Policy
  • September 03, 2001

Soviet Foreign Policy

A series of articles which deal with Soviet foreign policy. In Part One, we make our way through a series of treaties, pacts and secret alliances during the years leading up to WWII and Germany's attack on Russia.
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