June 18, 2021

Tanks a Lot



Tanks a Lot
Russia is really bringing out the big guns for this new museum display.  Photo by Vitaly Kuzmin via CC BY-SA 3.0

Russia has always had a sort of weird love affair with its military tank vehicles, and now they have the world's largest museum of tanks to prove it! On June 12, The Russian Federation's museum of patriotism and war (called "Patriot Park") opened an enormous display of tanks from all over the world in Kubinka, Moscow Oblast

As one would expect, their collection is truly varied. They have items from the USA, Britain, Germany, and Iraq, amongst other nations. Many of their items are quite rare, too; for instance, the British tank called the Conquerer (which weighs 65 tons and was the heaviest of the 1950s) can only be seen in 4 museums anywhere in the entire world. 

There are also many interesting examples of Soviet military equipment too. One example is a T-34 tank made in 1942, which sunk to the bottom of a lake in the Pskov region and remained there until 2000. The tank was removed from the lake and can now be seen on display at the museum. 

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