January 09, 2020

Of pigs and cussing and parachutes



Of pigs and cussing and parachutes
In Odder News

This week's Odder News, we cover everything from mummies to hogs, from cussing to bows and arrows. Oh, and skyscraper jumping...

  • Shoppers in the Siberian city of Tyumen were surprised to find three domesticated hogs roaming the alcohol aisle of the local supermarket. After sampling a few bottles of cognac following ham-fisted attempts to open them, the pigs were returned to their owner.
  • The ancient Egyptians were overthinking things: all you need to mummify someone is put them on an apartment building balcony in St. Petersburg for a couple years.
  • Opposite corners of Russia apparently have opposite levels of cussing: uncensored utterances are spoken most in Vladivostok and least in Petrozavodsk. Unsurprisingly, throughout Russia, higher living standards are correlated with less frequent exclamations like “f*** this.”
  • Russian authorities bowed to popular pressure and legalized hunting with bows and crossbows.
  • Two men in Krasnoyarsk jumped from the 24th floor of an apartment building with parachutes. All we can say is what Lenta.ru used as their url for the article: “Oh, Russians.”

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93 Untranslatable Russian Words

Every language has concepts, ideas, words and idioms that are nearly impossible to translate into another language. This book looks at nearly 100 such Russian words and offers paths to their understanding and translation by way of examples from literature and everyday life. Difficult to translate words and concepts are introduced with dictionary definitions, then elucidated with citations from literature, speech and prose, helping the student of Russian comprehend the word/concept in context.
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22 Russian Crosswords

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The Spine of Russia

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