January 18, 2021

Not-So Smart Crosswalks



Not-So Smart Crosswalks
These stripes (or "zebras" as they are called in Russian) look more like a maze than a path. Anonymous user, the community group "In Salekhard.ru" on VKontakte 

Anyone who has walked through busy Russian streets (or has even just seen one of those crazy Russian dashcam videos online) can appreciate how useful "Smart Crosswalks" could be. Unfortunately, ideas like this sometimes don't work out the way they were intended.

Salekhard, a city in Russia’s Far North, has officially begun to implement new “Smart Crosswalks” in its streets, although with lackluster results.

While the creators had hoped to develop a tool that would make crossing the street at night or in icy conditions safer and easier, it seems to have only angered one anonymous Salekhard resident, who took to popular Russian social media site VKontakte to publish an impassioned complaint about the initiative. It seems that the projectors just can’t seem to display the stripes in a straight path, and (perhaps more importantly) the warning lights often don’t even function properly. 

These devices work by projecting the classic yellow and white stripes on the pavement as well as by using a motion sensor, video camera, and LED sign to detect and signal the presence of pedestrians.

After this public outcry, it seems that city officials have taken notice and have made a resolve to fix the situation. But in the meantime, we would just stick to using the pedestrian underpass tunnels.   

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