March 04, 2022

No War Please


No War Please
"No war please" on camera. Screenshot, Twitter account @TSN_Sports

After the Russian army invaded Ukraine, the international outcry has been nearly universal. Russian tennis player Andrey Rublev decided to send a message thousands would see. 

After his tennis match at the Dubai championship, Rublev walked over to a camera with a marker and wrote "no war please" on the lens protector.

TSN Sports posted a video of Rublev's Twitter message, which has received over 347,000 likes. There have also been over two thousand replies to the tweet, many in support of Rublev's message, some even calling him brave.

The retweeted version can be seen here

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