January 27, 2021

No Beating Around the Bush


No Beating Around the Bush

“These promotions are illegal. <...> Of course, we must talk about the illegality of the actions, not about detentions. I don't see any violation at all. What is it, are these our first arrests? These are not the first uncoordinated rallies. Usually this ends with someone drawing up a complaint of administrative offense and then they are released. I am sure that now, if there are no provocations or clashes with the police, the same will happen.”

– The refreshing honesty of Valeriy Fadeyev, the Head of the Human Rights Council under the President of Russia, calling it like it is in the midst of massive anti-corruption protests rocking Russia. On January 23, Fadeyev announced that he takes no issue with arrests – not at “Free Navalny” protests, not at any protest! It’s not the first time it’s happened, after all.

 

 

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The Little Golden Calf

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Stargorod: A Novel in Many Voices

Stargorod: A Novel in Many Voices

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Steppe / Степь

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Bears in the Caviar

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