October 03, 2022

Mobilization Hotline


Mobilization Hotline
Ask away. Wikimedia Commons, A.Savin.

A new government initiative spearheaded by Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Chernyshenko allows Russian citizens with questions about Russia's new mobilization against Ukraine to call in to a hotline for answers.

Russians can dial 112 and be transferred to a knowledgeable operator through the service, which is facilitated by both federal and local governments. Authorities explain that the hotline will prevent "misinformation" and rumors by providing a trusted source.

This move comes as President Putin has ordered a "partial mobilization" of the Russian armed forces in an attempt to stem the tide after a Ukrainian counterattack recaptured much of the northern part of the country.

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