March 18, 2021

Lukashenko Gets the Putin Treatment



Lukashenko Gets the Putin Treatment
You wouldn't know it, but that dog is actually a fifteen-million-dollar purebred Pomeranian (not really). CTV.by

Belarusian president Alexander Lukashenko, well-known to our team for his various hijinks, has fallen under scrutiny for what some say are ill-gotten gains.

Investigative journalists at Radio Free Europe's Russian branch⁠— Radio Svoboda— have published a damning report on the origins of Lukashenko's wealth. Entitled "27 Years of Luxury," the article details Lukashenko's term in power (since 1994, almost 27 years) and argues that the high standard of living he enjoys in one of Europe's most impoverished and repressive countries is due to ill-gotten gains.

At least he's probably flattered, given his reported quote that Putin is one of his few friends, as the project is a parallel effort to Russian activist Alexei Navalny's exposé of Putin's enormous wealth.

Highlights include lavish palaces, high-quality food, and hangouts with other post-Soviet presidents, like the equally goofy equestrian/dentist/author/firearms expert Gurbanguly Berdimuhamedov of Turkmenistan.

See the investigation for yourself here.

Perhaps it's time for Lukashenko to face the music?

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