March 30, 2022

London Rallies for Ukraine


London Rallies for Ukraine

"The future of Ukraine will not be decided by Putin but by the people of Ukraine. It should not be decided by force but by freedom." 

– Mayor of London Sadiq Khan on March 26 

Over a month ago Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky asked the world to take to the streets and show solidarity with Ukraine. London has answered the call. On March 26, thousands arrived in central London to fly the colors of Ukraine and protest Putin's actions.

The director of the Ukrainian Institute London, the chair of London Councils (Labour), the president of the Trades Union Congress, a member of the European Movement, and many others made appearances during a gathering on Trafalgar Square to show their continuing support for Ukrainians.

The Ukrainian ambassador to the United Kingdom made a speech as well, thanking Britain for its continued support and urging Western civilization to help Ukraine. He later spoke in Ukrainian, assuring the new refugees that they were welcome in the UK.

The speeches ended with a live feed of the mayor of Kyiv addressing the crowds, and reminding them of their common beliefs: “We defend the same principles – please be together with Ukraine.” 

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