April 14, 2021

Hairy Hijinks


Hairy Hijinks

“Find someone who’s tall, get him to put on a suit, turn the fur inside out and run around in crowded places, shout so that the tourists will notice – but they won’t catch him. Of course, then you must mark him and let him be silent, so he won’t blurt out anything unnecessary somewhere.”

– On April 10, former governor of Kemerovo Oblast Aman Tuleyev admitted to dalliances with a local legend. Ten years prior to his confession, Tuleyev arranged a rendezvous at Azasskaya Cave in the Shoria Mountains - east of the Altai range - with none other than Bigfoot. While the furry darling shied away, Tuleyev was charmed. The governor went to Vladimir Makuta, the head of the Tashtagol region, and instructed him to celebrate the hefty seducer with a Bigfoot Day.  “Let them come and search. The region is profitable: you arrive, you have to pay for everything, eat, spend the night, have fun. Additional money will go to the treasury.” There’s even a one-million-ruble reward for the first man to discover the yeti. Strange that Tuleyev didn’t collect when he took his hairy friend for a ride in his ATV…

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