June 16, 2021

Get Them Vacs A-Rollin'


Get Them Vacs A-Rollin'

“The main condition is that the first shot of the vaccine must be administered between the 15 and 25 of June 2021 at the vaccination points of the Ministry of Health of the Moscow Region. For this purpose, you can choose any drug: ‘Sputnik V,’ ‘EpiVacCorona,’ and ‘KoviVak.’”

– Andrei Vorobyev, Governor of Moscow Oblast

To encourage vaccination of Russian citizens, Governor of Moscow Oblast Andrei Vorobyov announced on June 13 that any Russian who is vaccinated between June 15 and 25 will be eligible to win a new apartment.

The 74.9 square meter apartment will be located in the “New Proletarka” residential complex in Serpukhov. As long as the individual is over 18 years of age, provides a substantial list of personal information to the online portal “Gosuslugi,” and is vaccinated in the Moscow region, he or she will qualify for the raffle regardless of physical address or place of registration.

The first shot caveat is such a shame: imagine pulling up to that new apartment in one of the many cars that will also be rolled out as vaccination prizes for citizens of Moscow who get the shot between June 14 and July 11. The city’s Mayor Sergei Sobyanin has claimed that five such cars with be given away every week beginning June 23.

One way or another, all roads lead to Moscow.

 

 

 

 

 

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