December 16, 2020

Geography Lessons from Space



Geography Lessons from Space
Students will be able to have a unique lesson on geography. Image by NASA via Wikimedia Commons

What better way to learn geography than with a bird’s-eye view? Russian students will have the opportunity to get just such a look with a live lesson on geography from space.

On Monday, Russian astronauts onboard the International Space Station (ISS) offered a live lesson that covered how the earth is researched from space, what orbit means, and how spaceports’ geography affects launching satellites.

Roscosmos partnered with Moscow’s Museum of Cosmonautics to host the event. Russian astronauts Sergey Kud-Sverchkov and Sergey Ryzhikov led the discussion from the ISS, and  two experts, Mikhail Kornienko and Oksana Kushnyr, aided in the lesson from the museum. The lesson was broadcast live on the museum’s website, social media page, and on Roscosmos’ YouTube channel.

This lesson, titled “Earth — Our Space Address” («Земля — наш космический адрес»), is part of a larger series of educational efforts in the “Space Lesson 2.0 Reboot” project, which was launched at the beginning of this academic year. It includes live, interactive lessons on topics such as physics, chemistry, and geography, all with the input of ISS experts.

Recordings of the lessons are available via the project’s website.

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