June 28, 2022

A Nobel Donation


A Nobel Donation
"The most important message today is for people to understand that there’s a war going on and we need to help people who are suffering the most." -Dmitry Muratov. The Russian Life Files

On June 20, in New York City, 2021 Russian Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Dmitry Muratov auctioned off his Nobel medal for $103.5 million to help displaced Ukrainian children.

Muratov said he will donate all of the proceeds to UNICEF, which is currently assisting Ukrainian children who have been pushed out of their homes. Muratov said the most important thing for him is not to draw attention to himself, but to focus on helping those who are currently suffering.

While the bidder remains unknown, the auction set a world record. Previously, the most a Nobel medal auctioned off for was $5 million.

Russian Life has previously written on Muratov and his response to the invasion of Ukraine, here.

 

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