November 28, 2022

Cracking Down on Air Travel


Cracking Down on Air Travel

As of November 10, travelers through St. Petersburg's and Moscow's main passenger airports face the highest levels of antiterrorism security ever presented in Russia.

Moscow's Sheremetyevo, Domodedovo, and Vnukovo airports, as well as St. Petersburg's Pulkovo airport, recently announced that Russia's aviation authority, Rosaviatsiya, has increased their antiterrorism efforts to level 3: the highest possible level. Typically, Russian airports operate at levels 1 and 2, but apparent threats to these airports, which serve legions of travelers both within Russia and abroad, have encouraged Rosaviatsiya

The move comes as travel in Russia sees a surprising uptick, despite international sanctions and industry trends that might otherwise discourage tourism.

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Vladimir Gilyarovsky's classic portrait of the Russian capital is one of Russians’ most beloved books. Yet it has never before been translated into English. Until now! It is a spectactular verbal pastiche: conversation, from gutter gibberish to the drawing room; oratory, from illiterates to aristocrats; prose, from boilerplate to Tolstoy; poetry, from earthy humor to Pushkin. 
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Woe From Wit (bilingual)

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93 Untranslatable Russian Words

Every language has concepts, ideas, words and idioms that are nearly impossible to translate into another language. This book looks at nearly 100 such Russian words and offers paths to their understanding and translation by way of examples from literature and everyday life. Difficult to translate words and concepts are introduced with dictionary definitions, then elucidated with citations from literature, speech and prose, helping the student of Russian comprehend the word/concept in context.

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