October 16, 2022

Brussels Sprouts and Nuclear Strikes


Brussels Sprouts and Nuclear Strikes
A conspiring clique: Medvedev and Putin. Wikimedia Commons, Dmitry Medvedev

On October 13, EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Josep Borrell expressed his concern for increasing support to Ukraine and the possibility of the war expanding into one including nuclear weapons.

Russian Security Council Deputy Chairman (and former president) Dmitry Medvedev enthusiastically responded to Borrell's comments through his VKontakte page. Along with calling Borrell paranoid, he also referred to Borrell as a "withered Brussels sprout."

Medvedev added that Western nations don't actually care about Ukraine at all, which is evident in their unwillingness to give Ukraine all-out support. While Medvedev may claim that concern over a nuclear strike is simply "paranoia," Kremlin statements since the start of the war have shown that this paranoia may be justified.

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