March 08, 2021

The Tram from Hell



The Tram from Hell
Satan's #1 mode of transportation: tram Saikat Bhuiyan | unsplash.com

In Chelyabinsk, residents have been left in awe at the unholy terror known as “The Hell Tram.” 

Due to the unusually large amounts of snow the area has accumulated over the past several days, city officials have been hard at work trying to make the railways safe and clear for usage. One method of doing this running trams with specially suited snow-brushes to clear the way. 

The thing about these trams (which really aren’t all that uncommon in the snow-laden country) is that they push up an insane amount of snow. The resulting effect is that the tram speeding by looks more like a demonic glowing cloud of snow. 

Residents began noticing this snow monster while driving by it, and suddenly videos of it along with heavy-metal music as a backtrack began to trend on social media. Other residents joined in the fun, cheering for the “hellish tram, sent by the Devil himself, to fight against the snow.” 

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