April 26, 2021

The Cat Dragged In...?



The Cat Dragged In...?
Waiting for you... "Cat on a Tin Roof-1" by zeevveez is licensed under CC BY 2.0

A student from the Russian city of Perm got caught out like a cat on a hot tin roof this week when he found himself volunteering to save a feline stuck in a window frame.

On April 15, the young man climbed the canopy of the Russian Post Office building under the close watch of a crowd of concerned citizens. As the cat complained from the window, critics and advisors shouted their assistance.

“Bring it down gently!” “Come on, come on, come on!”  “Sideways! Sideways!” were shouted along with other encouragement.

Despite the ruckus, the young man managed to push the cat back into the apartment from whence, presumably, it came.

 

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