February 01, 2020

The Actor-Agents of the KGB



The Actor-Agents of the KGB
Art meets life: Grigoriy Zhzhonov, Soviet spy on and off the screen, with Vladimir Putin – himself a former KGB agent.   Presidential Press and Information Office | Wikipedia

Can’t get enough Russian spy movies? How about spies in movies?

A former KGB agent responsible for cultural affairs recently claimed that many Soviet celebrities, including multiple famous actors, were agents of the “special services,” as they say in Russian. They were allegedly recruited during labor camp sentences for notorious crimes like “anti-Soviet propaganda.”

As professional actors in government-sponsored movies, alongside their side-gigs as undercover agents, they ended up in quite pro-Soviet careers. While a former KGB general doubts that his ex-colleague could have had this specific information, others agree it is extremely plausible that many Soviet cultural luminaries led double lives: just like an “I Spy” game, hidden in plain, and very public, sight.

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