April 22, 2022

Spot the Difference


Spot the Difference
Mightier than the sword? Pexels, Daian Gan

Ukrainian-Israeli artist Zoya Cherkassky-Nnadi spent her childhood in Kyiv, Ukraine, until the age of 14. In 1991, she and her family moved to Israel. Shortly after making visits to Ukraine in 2014, Zoya began creating pieces of art within a project she calls her "Soviet Childhood."

Zoya most recently visited Ukraine four months before Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine. After bombs began to fall and the war had officially begun, Zoya and her family made their way to Israel. Now out of Ukraine, Zoya is using her previous pieces of art from "Soviet Childhood" to convey what is happening  in Ukraine and provide humanitarian aid. 

Drawing from previous pieces, Zoya is now creating a new project titled "Before and After." Pieces within this project are replicas of her previous works in "Soviet Childhood," only now they reflect the current state of Ukraine. For example, her piece "On the Balcony" features a mother and son standing on a balcony observing the beautiful city. The 2022 "After" version of this piece features the same mother and son on the balcony cowering from falling bombs and a red sky. Essentially, a juxtaposition of happy childhood memories and horrid times of suffering for the country. 

Zoya is creating meaningful pieces of art that have touched the hearts of many across the globe and helped to bring awareness to the reality in Ukraine. She is also selling the works to provide monetary aid to Ukraine. The pieces of "Before and After" can be seen here.

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The Little Golden Calf

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A book that dares to explore the humanity of priests and pilgrims, saints and sinners, Faith & Humor has been both a runaway bestseller in Russia and the focus of heated controversy – as often happens when a thoughtful writer takes on sacred cows. The stories, aphorisms, anecdotes, dialogues and adventures in this volume comprise an encyclopedia of modern Russian Orthodoxy, and thereby of Russian life.
Bears in the Caviar

Bears in the Caviar

Bears in the Caviar is a hilarious and insightful memoir by a diplomat who was “present at the creation” of US-Soviet relations. Charles Thayer headed off to Russia in 1933, calculating that if he could just learn Russian and be on the spot when the US and USSR established relations, he could make himself indispensable and start a career in the foreign service. Remarkably, he pulled it of.
The Frogs Who Begged for a Tsar

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The fables of Ivan Krylov are rich fonts of Russian cultural wisdom and experience – reading and understanding them is vital to grasping the Russian worldview. This new edition of 62 of Krylov’s tales presents them side-by-side in English and Russian. The wonderfully lyrical translations by Lydia Razran Stone are accompanied by original, whimsical color illustrations by Katya Korobkina.
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Moscow and Muscovites

Vladimir Gilyarovsky's classic portrait of the Russian capital is one of Russians’ most beloved books. Yet it has never before been translated into English. Until now! It is a spectactular verbal pastiche: conversation, from gutter gibberish to the drawing room; oratory, from illiterates to aristocrats; prose, from boilerplate to Tolstoy; poetry, from earthy humor to Pushkin. 
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