December 21, 2021

Snow Fright


Snow Fright
Surely she lost her immortality?! RIA Novosti Telegram

Snegurochka, or the Snowmaiden granddaughter of Father Frost, is an essential figure of the Russian holiday season. In Kostroma, this year’s Snowmaiden seems to be more of a snow job.

On December 13, online outlet Kostroma Today reported that the city’s sparkling Snowmaiden structure, once called the “bride of Darth Vader,” has returned for the second year in a row.

The Snowmaiden is thought to have roots in pagan lore, and was first popularized by the playwright Alexander Ostrovsky, in his nineteenth-century play “Spring Fairytale.” In the tale, the Snowmaiden is the beautiful and lonely daughter of Frost and Spring who relinquishes immortality for the ability to love. She evaporates from the sun’s rays when she finally falls in love and leaves her forest shelter.

The Kostroma decoration is of a sort commonly found in Russia and Eastern Europe during the winter season, made of metal structure and laced with strings of lights. You often see find reindeer, Christmas trees, bears, balls, and jingle bells, but sometimes you’ll also stumble across a figure so horrifying that you’d rather run in the opposite direction.

“Remove this monstrosity already - it scares everyone off with its eerie appearance,” one resident of Kostroma wrote. "Alexander Nikolaevich Ostrovsky has already turned over in his grave a thousand times from such a disgrace of a city. When I pass, I cross myself against sin a little farther away."

Some Kostroma residents are fans of the strange lady, but others are distraught, finding her more horrifying than before. Although this is the second year the Snowmaiden structure made an appearance, it was only removed the first time at the end of May!

Do not look into her eyes, some advise… this Snegurochka sure isn’t as pure as the driven snow.

 

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